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Braving the Deep

If you were ever to tell us to name one guy who knows how to catch big fish more than anyone else, Terry Lord of Mitchell, Georgia, would be our guy hands-down.

Mr. Lord is a bit of a fishing celebrity in our part of the State.

He’s known for catching over 300 BIG fish (about 8 pounds and over) in his lifetime. (And he’s only about the young age of 70!)

“Most people probably would be bored outta’ their mind fishin’ with me,” says Terry. “When I fish, I don’t fish on the banks tryin’ to catch as many fish as I possibly can. I fish for the few big ones hangin’ out in the water.”

“I only fish deep water. That’s where all the big fish are, waiting for dinner to swim by.”

The large fish with the most experience learn that it’s safest to grab the smaller fish swimming near the shore and then tear it out back towards the deep end.

That’s why you sometimes might catch a once-in-a-lifetime fish by fishing off the bank.

As Terry wisely says, “They don’t get that big bein’ dumb.”

And Terry proved his fishing wisdom with his most recent catch.

A while ago, Terry Lord was with his 18-year-old nephew, Nathan Todd, in Hunting and Fishing Country of Sandersville looking at all the gear, when Gimmie’s “Sista’ Shad” spinner bait caught Nathan’s eye.

Terry says, “ When I looked at it, it didn’t look like it’d do much. It was a pretty lure, no question, which is what drew my nephew to it in the first place; but after years of fishing, I’ve learned that most of the time pretty doesn’t mean anything when it comes to catchin’ a big fish.”

“But, my nephew wanted it real bad, so I decided I’d get it for him.”

And so, Terry and Nathan went fishing together soon after, even though Terry really didn’t want to that day. (We’re starting to notice a bit of a soft spot for the nephew.)

Nathan’s fishing line broke twice that day (one of the many reasons that Terry says you absolutely need good equipment if you want to catch a keeper).

And he was about to put on his new “Sista’ Shad”, but Terry took it from Nathan and put it on his own line.

“I paid $10 for that lure, dang it, and I wasn’t about to let my nephew lose that one, too.”

So, Terry cast it about 5 or 6 times, and just when he was about to give up on the lure:

BAM!

All of a sudden, Terry got hooked on a sure enough hog.

Terry describes, “ When she first hit it, I thought it wasn’t that big.”

Then Nathan yelled, “Get me the net! Get me the net!”

And when Terry realized he couldn’t get the net, he knew what a sea monster he had on his line.

Terry told us, “ It was a struggle just tryin’ not to let her jump. The last thing you want is for them to jump because that gives them all the opportunity in the world to get off of your line.”

Finally, Terry and Nathan were able to get her into the boat, and when they weighed her the first time, Nathan looked up at his uncle in amazement and said that the bass was over 13 pounds.

Terry thought that weight couldn’t possibly be right, so he told his nephew to turn the scale back off and on and weigh her again.

And after the second time, Nathan looked up at his uncle and proclaimed, “It’s 14 lbs. 2 oz., and I’m stickin’ to it!”

And so, at 14 lbs. 2 oz., Terry Lord ended up catching the biggest fish he ever has in his entire life (this coming from a man whose previous record was a 12 lb. bass), and created an incredible lifetime memory that will forever be engraved on the hearts of both himself and his nephew.

We’re so proud of Mr. Terry for his newest fishing accomplishment, and we’re so glad that we got to play even a small part of this awesome memory through our “Sista’ Shad” spinner bait (that may or may not be too pretty for its own good).

And to all of you out there reading this who’ve been searching for that once-in-a-lifetime sea monster, you might want to try taking a lesson from Terry Lord:

Never be afraid of braving the deep.

Point of Contact

Point-of-Contact

What is a fishing lure?

A way to catch fish?

A shiny thing?

. . . Something you can get your ear hooked on?

While a fishing lure is all of those things, to the Gimmie Crew it means a little bit more.

We believe that it has the power to connect people who are miles apart from one another. Even people who have never even met.

Recently, our adventurous friend John Hasford had to go to Maryland for work. (Don’t worry, work didn’t ruin the adventure).

So he took the time to check out St. Mary’s Lake.

While he was there, he actually met a guy he had been watching on YouTube, Darren Reinhart, and so John started telling him about Gimmie (surprise, surprise).

The next time John went to St. Mary’s Lake, Darren was already out there fishing, so John decided to leave him a little Gimmie present (a card and a lure).

With that same lure, Darren ended up catching his biggest fish yet.

Later, John decided to go fishing with a Gimmie Smokin’ Shad swim bait, with a grandfather and his grandson fishing on the side of the lake.

After catching 2 fish within 3 casts, John decided to give the lure he was using to the grandson and, once again, talked about Gimmie Lure Co. (What else did you expect?)

After giving up his smokin’ shad, John switched over to his Gimmie 3.5” Swim Minnow, and it was on!

All of a sudden out of nowhere, John thought he had caught the Loch Ness monster, and that big ol’ bass started shooting towards him like a torpedo.

John hauled his catch into his kayak, and brought it over to the grandfather and grandson to see if they had a scale.

And when John held that fish up in the air, the granddad jumped straight into the water he was so excited.

About the same time that Darren caught his personal best, John also caught his personal best: an enormous 10 pound bass.

Not only did a fishing lure catch two men their own lifetime memories and accomplishments that they can hold onto forever, but it also created points of contact that have the ability to forge friendships between people who had only just met.

The lure even created a memory that the grandfather and grandson can hold onto for years to come.

That’s the reason we create fishing lures.

So that YOU can have your own point of contact.

So then, what kind of memories and relationships will you form with your Gimmie lure?

Customer Appreciation Day 2017

Customer-Appreciation-Day-2017

Hey Friends!  Come meet Shannon Anderson and the “Gimmie Family” Saturday, May 13th, for Customer Appreciation Day at Hunting & Fishing Country, 1151 South Harris St., Sandersville, GA.  The fun starts at 10AM with product demonstrations from Shannon.  Enjoy Hot Dogs and drinks while you check out the 2017 product line from Gimmie Lure Company. We look forward to meeting you and making new friends!

Palmetto Sportsmen’s Classic – 2017

Please stop by the “Gimmie Lure” booth, March 24 – 26 at the State Fairgrounds in Columbia, South Carolina.

We are proud to be part of the 33rd Annual “Palmetto Sportsmen’s Classic.”

We will be offering the new line of Gimmie Plastics, Spinnerbaits, Buzzbaits, Apparel, and more!

Florida Outdoor Mega Show

Please stop by the “Gimmie Lure” booth, February 11 and 12, at the Florida Outdoor Mega Show – St. Johns County Fairgrounds.

Show hours:  Saturday 10am – 6pm, Sunday 10am – 5pm.

We will debut the new line of Gimmie Plastics, Spinnerbaits, Buzzbaits, Apparel, and more!

Match the Hatch

Gimmie Fishing Technique:

If there is one truth to the world of fishing, it is this: Big fish eat smaller fish.

And, depending on where you’re at and what time of year it is, the type of smaller fish that are running for their lives from said big fish (kind of like Godzilla) changes.

What does that mean for you?

Well, if you’re fishing with a lure that looks like a little crawfish when the big fish only have a craving for little shad, we’re afraid you’ll be mighty out of luck.

The good news: You can create your own luck.

The bad news: You have to learn stuff.

Basically, “match the hatch” means that you’ve got to match your lure to whatever “hatch,” or baby, smaller fish, that Big Daddy’s snacking on right then.

And to do that, you’ve actually got to figure out what the hatch is. Which requires you to study. (We know, we know. We just died a little on the inside, too.)

Thankfully, the kind of studying you have to do is a lot more fun than what you did in school.

Study Time

Now, there’s about 4 ways you can go about this:

  • A lot of fishing (or experience, for you more educated folks).
    • Trust us, once you’ve fished in a certain spot long enough, you know what’s going on in that water, and that includes what the big fish are eating on.
  • Asking other people who fish a lot (or at least know stuff).
    • This usually means either asking a local (an owner of a tackle shop is a safe bet) or a fisherman who could pass as a local (meaning, he’s fished there a WHOLE lot).
  • Actually seeing the hatch.
    • Meaning, that water’s either got to be clear as Dasani water, or you’ve got to catch one instead.
  • If all else fails, Google.
    • Let’s face it, this is what we usually do now-a-days if we don’t know something.
    • It’s there. It’s useful. It helps you catch fish. And you can eat potato chips while you’re using it.
    • Why not?

Putting It All Together

Now that you’ve done your proper studying (and ate some potato chips), now it’s time to put that brain knowledge to use.

There’s three key info bits that you’re going to need: Season, location, and color.

For season, it all depends on the time of year.

Winter? Summer? Early fall? Halfway through spring? It’s important.

Different times of the year mean different types of hatch.

The location you’re fishing at can also mean different kinds of hatch.

We’d have to guess that what’s hatching in Georgia and what’s hatching in Alaska at the same time of year are probably not going to be the same thing.

And finally, now that you know what’s hatching based on your season and location, you’ve got to determine the hatch’s color.

All this beautiful knowledge won’t do you a bit of good if you can’t match your lure to the hatch.

For example, for one part of the year a crawfish can be bright as a parrot, but for another part it can be as pale as a naked mole rat. (Nice picture we just put in your brain, huh?)

So, if you’re fishing with something that looks like a tricked out peacock with red and yellow when what the fish are really looking for is something that’s pale, blue, and wimpy; chances are you’re probably not going to catch very much.

And that’s basically what “matching the hatch” is.

If you have any questions or would like to add something, feel free to leave a comment.

Or, if you’d like to get a general idea of winter hatch, check out our blog post “Fishing in Winter.”

Happy Fishing!

-The Gimmie Family

Fishing Life Lesson #1: The Benefit of Hard Work

If you’ve been fishing long enough, you probably already know you can learn some serious life lessons while spending time with those slimy little creatures (no, I’m not talking about your fishing buddies).

And one of the first lessons that fishing probably can ever teach you is: If you want something, you have to work for it.

You can’t just stand on the side of the lake and expect fish to jump into your open arms. (I know fish don’t seem that smart, but even they have some standards.)

If you really want to catch some fish, you’ve got to at least get out your fishing pole and stick it in the water.

Putting a Gimmie lure on said pole could also help you catch even more fish. (Just saying.)

Anyways, I think you get my drift.

The more effort, time, and work you put into fishing, the more fish you’ll get.

Why do you think professional fishermen are so good at fishing?

It’s because they spent years perfecting their technique, studying all kinds of fish, and practicing over and over again until the fish just seemed to swim up to them whenever they willed it.

The same goes for everything else in life.

If you want the world to hand over something to you (for example, fish), then you’ve got to give something in return (fishing).

So, put on those big boy and girl pants, and fish on!

Because whether or not you can see it now, one day you will reap what you sow.

 

Happy fishing!

From: The Gimmie Family

Gimmie Freedom

In the midst of so much change in our country, it’s easy to forget just how blessed we truly are.

We are free to live our dreams.

We are free to say what we want despite how it affects others.

We are free to vote.

And in honor of the Thanksgiving season and all of the blessings that we, as Americans, are given by God, I think it’s high time that we slow down to show a little gratitude.

First of all, the Gimmie Family would like to thank God for blessing our country against great odds.

Thank you to all of the presidents throughout the generations that have sacrificed their own lives and safety for the sake of the United States and the people within it.

Thank you to our brand new president, for having the courage to accept a role of leadership that most of us wouldn’t have the strength to uphold.

And we here at Gimmie Lure Co. would like to take an extra moment to especially thank our veterans who have served our country so valiantly.

YOU are the reason that we are free, and you deserve every honor and praise that the people of the United States, citizen or not, can offer.

You, the heroes of the United States of America, will always hold a special place in the hearts of the Gimmie Family.

God bless our veterans, our heroes, and God bless America from now into the future.

Here’s to the Vets:

Happy Veteran’s Day!

Winter Fishing

As fall comes to a close and winter rolls around, the Gimmie family knows the real question that should be on everyone’s mind: CAN I STILL FISH?

And the answer is yes. Yes you can.

But, you’re going to have to change your fishing strategy.  Because, let’s face it – there’s a reason so many people think you can’t go fishing in winter.

So, without further ado – if you’d rather keep on your fishing hat instead of trading it for an orange vest this year – here’s the basic tips and tricks for fishing in winter (specifically in freshwater).

First of all, fish are cold-blooded. Plain and simple. (Don’t worry, this is the Gimmie family. We won’t be getting all “sciencey” on you.)

That pretty much means that if the water’s colder, the fish won’t be wanting to move off of their nice, comfy fish sofas any time soon.

So, if you’re trying to fish your lure like a bat straight out of the Underworld like you did in summer, chances are the fish aren’t going to want to chase it down.

In the case of winter fishing, patience is most definitely a virtue.

It can also help to use a bigger, heavier lure to help slow it down even more. A live-looking lure can also add some luck on your side since it looks like something warm to eat. (If you were cold, would you really want to eat an equally cold turkey leg?)

Shad, herring, and yearling sunfish and perch are what fish tend to eat in winter since everybody else in the lake is hibernating, so try to find a lure that looks like one of those fish as well.

And since the fish are cold-blooded, that also means that they are going to be doing everything in their tiny fish power to stay warm, which includes huddling together in the warmer parts of the water.

Find a good spot where all the bass, muskie, crappie, or even catfish are all gathered, and prepare to camp out (not literally, but you get what I’m saying).

But the most important rule of fishing in winter is to STAY SAFE.

Bundle up like a caterpillar in a cocoon and check that weather forecast! (Because rain + cold – fish = no fun.)

 

From the Gimmie Family:
Enjoy your winter, and fish on!

Light of Life

Many are without power due to Hurricane Hermine. The Gimmie Family wants to remind everyone that there is a LIGHT more POWERFUL than any storm you may encounter!   John 8:12

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